Chinese Italics: where are the Oblique Chinese fonts?

There are some questions that come up again and again when typesetters and designers who are used to working with Roman fonts start to tackle Chinese typesetting. One perennial issue, which crops up even in professional fonts which supply several … Continue reading

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Chinese typesetting basics

Chinese is a global language of increasing importance. The population of China is over 1.3 billion, and the number of Chinese internet users has been predicted to have topped 550 million by the end of 2011. Yet Chinese typesetting engenders … Continue reading

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Numbers in Different Languages: Typesetting Multilingual Numerals

Not all languages share the same numerals; something it can be importantly to remember from the start of the design process. A page design that plays on the shape of a number might fall apart when typeset in a foreign … Continue reading

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Greek typesetting without the tears

Greek demonstrator protects herself against tear gasPic: Ggia via Wikimedia Commons Greece has been prominent in the news for all the wrong reasons for a year or two. But whether you need to typeset an instruction manual or a protest … Continue reading

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Numbers in Arabic: Hindi numerals or Arabic numerals?

Two different forms of numerals exist in Arabic text. You can write precisely the same number using either of the two systems of numerals. This means you can use either Arabic numerals or Hindi numerals to write numbers in Arabic … Continue reading

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Arabic Typesetting as Art

In one of those fortune happenstances that make London great, I stumbled on this window display of Arabic packaging.

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Bon appétit longer in French!

Text translated into a foreign language will usually be a different length to the English original. In languages such as Chinese you can be confident that it will be shorter, but in many languages the translated text will be longer. … Continue reading

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Getting started with Korean typesetting

Korean is the language of both South and North Korea, as well as being one of the two official languages in Yanbian Autonomous Prefecture in northeastern China. The script used for writing Korean is know as Hangul in South Korea … Continue reading

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Unicode just keeps getting bigger

Unicode, the standard for consistent encoding of the world’s writing systems, is a bedrock of modern multilingual typesetting and web design. February saw a major update to this standard to Unicode 6.0. The update adds a further 2,088 characters taking … Continue reading

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Getting started with German typesetting

German is an important global language, with approximately 120 million native speakers and perhaps 80 million more who speak it as a second language. It is the main language of Germany and Austria, with a significant part of the Swiss … Continue reading

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